Wednesday, July 26 2017 18:20 EEST
USA
U.S. Special Operations Forces train with Ukrainian counterparts
U.S, Special,  Operations,  Forces, Ukrainian,  Counterparts

As the U.S. special operations forces were invited this year to participate in Sea Breeze-2017, the Ukrainian-U.S. military exercise in southern Ukraine, the U.S. Special Operations Command Europe's Naval Special Warfare Command operators were “eager to sign up for the mission,” the U.S. Department of Defense reports.

This is the first time that special operations forces have operated at Sea Breeze, said U.S. Navy Capt. Michael Villegas, the exercise's director. "[Their] capabilities are extremely valued by the Ukrainians and extremely valuable to the U.S.

" Naval Special Warfare Command operators were completely integrated into the various air, land and sea missions that required their unique warfighting skill set. Exercise Sea Breeze is a perfect fit for special operations forces to train and exercise their capabilities, the exercise's lead special operations forces planner said. "With the support of the [Air Force's] 352nd Special Operations Wing, we saw a prime opportunity to support [special operations] mission-essential training with our Ukrainian allies," he said.

He added that naval special warfare units bring a host of unique capabilities into the exercise scenario, such as rigid-hull inflatable boats; visit, board, search and seizure expertise; and the strongest direct action capabilities available. However, Villegas noted, capability is only one piece of the puzzle when training alongside a partner nation with shared objectives to assure, deter, and defend in an increasingly complex environment.

Achieving interoperability with partner nations and interservice partners is a common objective at exercises like Sea Breeze. But here, the U.S. special operations forces capitalized on it. "Interoperability is our ability to conduct combined planning, problem solving, and mission execution efficiently to achieve a mutually-defined end state," Villegas said.

"We have combined with our Ukrainian colleagues to integrate their experience and capabilities within our key positions," he said. "Starting in the command team and further within our operations, communications, logistics, and intelligence departments, we were fully partnered."

Down at the platoon level, operators fast-roped from hovering U.S. Air Force CV-22 Osprey aircraft assigned to U.S. Special Operations Command Europe, conducted personnel recovery training and boarded vessels at sea.

As with any exercise of this size and scope, there were challenges to overcome to make the exercise a success while identifying tactical and technical gaps in partner capabilities. "The first major obstacle we had, but were prepared for, was the language barrier," the platoon commander said. "Another was that our mission sets differed slightly from our counterparts'."

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