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Jamala’s 1944: What is Ukrainian Eurovision song about?
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The Crimean Tatars’ deportation is one of the darkest pages in the history of the Soviet Union and the most terrible tragedy of the nation.

Jamala is the singer who presents Ukraine at Eurovision-2016 in Stockholm. On February 21, she won in the final of Ukrainian national selection and said she’d present Ukraine with relevant dignity.

In Sweden Jamala performed a song "1944" that reveals tragedy of the Crimean Tatar people in general and of the singer's family in particular.

The singer had previously confessed that she was inspired by her great-grandmother's story about the tragedy that happened to the Crimean Tatars in 1944.

The song is performed in English and Crimean Tatar languages.

Jamala '1944' (lyrics):

When strangers are coming...

They come to your house,

They kill you all

and say,

We’re not guilty

not guilty.

Where is your mind?

Humanity cries.

You think you are gods.

But everyone dies.

Don't swallow my soul.

Our souls

Yaşlığıma toyalmadım

Men bu yerde yaşalmadım

Yaşlığıma toyalmadım

Men bu yerde yaşalmadım

(I couldn't spend my youth there

Because you took away my peace)

We could build a future

Where people are free

to live and love.

The happiest time.

Where is your heart?

Humanity rise.

You think you are gods

But everyone dies.

Don't swallow my soul.

Our souls

Yaşlığıma toyalmadım

Men bu yerde yaşalmadım

Yaşlığıma toyalmadım

Men bu yerde yaşalmadım

vatanima toyalmadim

(I couldn't spend my youth there

Because you took away my peace

I couldn't spend my youth there

I couldn't have my homeland)

The Crimean Tatars’ deportation is one of the darkest pages in the history of the Soviet Union and the most terrible tragedy of the nation. On May 18-20, 1944, the NKVD herded almost all the Tatar population of Crimea into rail cars and sent them in the direction of Uzbekistan in 70 special trains. The Soviet government accused the Crimean Tatars of collaboration with the Nazis and carried out one of the fastest deportations in the world in revenge.

However, the accusations of collaboration were was just an excuse. In fact, the roots of the Kremlin's antagonism to the Crimean Tatars go back to the 1930s, when the Soviet policy towards other nations of the USSR became repressive.

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