Wednesday, May 11 2016 20:15 EEST
World
Ambassador Ken Ichiro Sasae: President Obama’s visit to Hiroshima at the end of this month will significantly add momentum to Japan and America’s collaborative efforts in these fields
Barack Obama, Japan, embassy, Prime Minister, visit, Hiroshima, atomic bomb, President, World War ll, USA, military, aircraft, jet, nuclear
novosib-room.ru

According to Reuters, Barack Obama will be the first U.S. president to visit Hiroshima in Japan later this month, but his visit should not be viewed as an apology for United States' dropping of an atomic bomb.

President Obama will advance his vision of a nuclear weapons-free world.

White House spokesman Josh Earnest said: 'President Obama and Japan Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will highlight his continued commitment to pursuing the peace and security of a world without nuclear weapons.'

Embassy of Japan in the USA shared on Facebook:

'I would like to take a moment to acknowledge the announcement today that President Obama will visit Hiroshima later this month. I join Prime Minister Abe in welcoming this visit, to a city I grew quite fond of during my time there as a high school student. I also hope this moment gives Japan and the United States an opportunity to honor together the memory of lives who were lost during the war and to renew our commitment to seek the peace and security of a world without nuclear weapons.

As you may know, President Obama will be the first sitting U.S. President to visit Hiroshima. This historic visit is a testament to the strength of the Japan-U.S. friendship and alliance.

Prime Minister Abe and President Obama have discussed the issue of non-proliferation and disarmament, as well as nuclear security on various occasions, including the recent Nuclear Security Summit held April this year here in Washington, DC. Shortly after that, at G7 Foreign Minister’s meeting at Hiroshima, Hiroshima Declaration on Nuclear Disarmament and Non-Proliferation was adopted. President Obama’s visit to Hiroshima at the end of this month will significantly add momentum to Japan and America’s collaborative efforts in these fields.

I look forward to the successful visit by the President to Hiroshima, and to the further strengthening of the ties between the two nations.

-Ambassador Ken Ichiro Sasae'

The United States, with the consent of the United Kingdom as laid down in the Quebec Agreement, dropped nuclear weapons on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945, during the final stage of World War II.

On August 6, the U.S. dropped a uranium gun-type atomic bomb (Little Boy) on the city of Hiroshima. American President Harry S. Truman called for Japan's surrender 16 hours later, warning them to 'expect a rain of ruin from the air, the like of which has never been seen on this earth.'

At the time of its bombing, Hiroshima was a city of both industrial and military significance. A number of military units were located nearby, the most important of which was the headquarters of Field Marshal Shunroku Hata's Second General Army, which commanded the defense of all of southern Japan, and was located in Hiroshima Castle. 

latest news
ALL NEWS >